A Phil-for-an-ill Blog

January 21, 2009

Jerry Brunetti – Food as Medicine (2/2; 5/9)


http://www.agri-dynamics.com/

In 1999 Jerry Brunetti was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and given 6 months to live. He did not submit to chemotherapy, but rather, developed his own unique dietary approach to enhance his immune system. In this informative video, Jerry shares his personal experiences and provides his recipe for healthy living. You will learn about the crucial importance of minerals, which foods to choose for your best health requirements and what to avoid. After viewing this video you’ll realize the remarkable value of food in building good foundations, and providing buffers, to keep your body healthy.

Topics of the second video include:

Topics include:

  1. The virtue of Cilantro or coriander in mopping up heavy metals in your system as it’s a very effective heavy metal chelator.
  2. The virtue of salicilic acid.
  3. Why eggs are so healthy.
  4. Coconut oil, an extremely healthy and healing oil.
  5. Why cholesterol isn’t bad of and by itself.
  6. Flax seed oil, a great source of omega 3 fatty acids.
  7. The trouble with grains and the benefits of fermented grain (sourdough bread)
  8. Good milk versus bad milk; hyper immune milk and raw milk versus pasteurized and homogenized milk
  9. Good things about butter.
  10. Good things about cholesterol.
  11. Good soy (=fermented soy), Bad soy (=non-fermented soy, such as soy milk).
  12. The virtue of selenium and iodine.
  13. Natural anti-cancerous compounds.

Check out the accompanying resources page for slides and food advice.

Video 1; Part 1of10
Video 1; Part 2of10
Video 1; Part 3of10
Video 1; Part 4of10
Video 1; Part 5of10
Video 1; Part 6of10
Video 1; Part 7of10
Video 1; Part 8of10
Video 1; Part 9of10
Video 1; Part 10of10

Video 2; Part 1of9
Video 2; Part 2of9
Video 2; Part 3of9
Video 2; Part 4of9

Video 2; Part 6of9
Video 2; Part 7of9
Video 2; Part 8of9
Video 2; Part 9of9

Notes: (blue bold-faced emphasis is all mine)

  1. Herxheimer reaction

    The Herxheimer reaction (also known as Jarisch-Herxheimer or Herx) occurs when large quantities of toxins are released into the body as bacteria (typically Spirochetal bacteria) die, due to antibiotic treatment or rapid detoxification.

    Typically the death of these bacteria and the associated release of endotoxins occurs faster than the body can remove the toxins via the natural detoxification process performed by the kidneys and liver. It is manifested by fever, chills, headache, myalgia (muscle pain), and exacerbation of skin lesions. Duration in syphilis is normally only a few hours but can be much longer, up to months or years, for other diseases. The intensity of the reaction reflects the intensity of inflammation present.

    The Herxheimer reaction has shown an increase in inflammatory cytokines during the period of exacerbation, including tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-6 and interleukin-8.[1][2]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herxheimer_reaction

  2. Natural killer cell

    Natural killer cells (or NK cells) are a type of cytotoxic lymphocyte that constitute a major component of the innate immune system. NK cells play a major role in the rejection of tumors and cells infected by viruses. The cells kill by releasing small cytoplasmic granules of proteins called perforin and granzyme that cause the target cell to die by apoptosis or necrosis.

    NK-cells are defined as large granular lymphocytes that do not express T-cell antigen receptors (TCR) or Pan T marker CD3 or surface immunoglobulins (Ig) B cell receptor but that usually express the surface markers CD16 (Fc?RIII) and CD56 in humans, and NK1.1/NK1.2 in certain strains of mice. Up to 80% of NK cells also express CD8.

    They were named “natural killers” because of the initial notion that they do not require activation in order to kill cells that are missing “self” markers of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I.
    [...]

    Mechanism

    NK cells are cytotoxic; small granules in their cytoplasm contain proteins such as perforin and proteases known as granzymes. Upon release in close proximity to a cell slated for killing, perforin forms pores in the cell membrane of the target cell through which the granzymes and associated molecules can enter, inducing apoptosis. The distinction between apoptosis and cell lysis is important in immunology: lysing a virus-infected cell would only release the virions, whereas apoptosis leads to destruction of the virus inside.

    NK cells are activated in response to interferons or macrophage-derived cytokines. They serve to contain viral infections while the adaptive immune response is generating antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells that can clear the infection. Patients deficient in NK cells prove to be highly susceptible to early phases of herpes virus infection.

    In order for NK cells to defend the body against viruses and other pathogens, they require mechanisms that enable the determination of whether a cell is infected or not. The exact mechanisms remain the subject of current investigation, but recognition of an “altered self” state is thought to be involved. To control their cytotoxic activity, NK cells possess two types of surface receptors: activating receptors and inhibitory receptors. Most of these receptors are not unique to NK cells and can be present in other T cell subsets as well.

    These inhibitory receptors recognize MHC class I alleles, which could explain why NK cells kill cells possessing low levels of MHC class I molecules. This inhibition is crucial to the role played by NK cells. MHC class I molecules consist of the main mechanism by which cells display viral or tumor antigens to cytotoxic T-cells. A common evolutionary adaption to this seen in both intracellular microbes and tumours is a chronic down-regulation of these MHC I molecules, rendering the cell impervious to T-cell mediated immunity. It is believed that NK cells, in turn, evolved as an evolutionary response to this adaption, as the loss of the MHC would deprive these cells of the inhibitory effect of MHC and render these cells vulnerable to NK-cell mediated lysis.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_killer_cell

  3. Colostrum

    Colostrum (also known as beestings or first milk or “immune milk”) is a form of milk produced by the mammary glands of mammals in late pregnancy and the few days after giving birth.

    Effects in infants

    Colostrum is high in carbohydrates, protein, and antibodies and low in fat (as human newborns may find fat difficult to digest). Newborns have very small digestive systems, and colostrum delivers its nutrients in a very concentrated low-volume form. It has a mild laxative effect, encouraging the passing of the baby’s first stool, which is called meconium. This clears excess bilirubin, a waste product of dead red blood cells which is produced in large quantities at birth due to blood volume reduction, from the infant’s body and helps prevent jaundice. In humans and mice, colostrum contains immunoglobulins such as IgA and IgM. IgA will be absorbed through the intestinal epithelial, travel through the blood and will be secreted onto other Type 1 mucosal surfaces. Colostrum also contains a variety of growth factors (IGfs).

    Adult consumption

    Few scientific studies suggest that adult human consumption of bovine colostrum is beneficial to general health. Proponents of the use of bovine colostrum by humans as a dietary supplement claim that bovine colostrum raises both general immunity and physical strength, and sometimes cite the few studies of bovine colostrum in humans. Most of these studies do not show great efficacy of normal colostrum for human consumption, but show efficacy for specific health and immunity parameters when using Hyper Immunized colostrum (see below) [1][2][3]

    Hyper Immunized Colostrum (Colostrum of Cows Immunized Against Specific Antigens)

    Some biotechnology companies (with the leading one being the Australian www.Immuron.com) have now taken further steps by injecting into cows proprietary vaccines protecting against human diseases, theorizing that such “hyper-immunized” primed colostrum might allow disease specific antibodies to be highlighted in the bovine colostrum, resulting in a dietary supplement with attributes for fighting specific pathogens. A few examples are IBD and IBS, Mucositis and Influenza [4] [5].

  4. Indole-3-carbinol

    Indole-3-carbinol (C9H9NO) is produced by the breakdown of the glucosinolate glucobrassicin which can be found at relatively high levels in cruciferous vegetables. Indole-3-carbinol is the subject of on-going Biomedical research into its possible anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and anti-atherogenic effects. Research on indole-3-carbinol has been conducted primarily using laboratory animals and cultured cells. Limited and inconclusive human studies have been reported. A recent review of the biomedical research literature found that, “evidence of an inverse association between cruciferous vegetable intake and breast or prostate cancer in humans is limited and inconsistent” and “larger randomized controlled trials are needed” to determine if supplemental indole-3-carbinol has health benefits[1].

    Indole-3-carbinol and cancer

    Investigation of mechanisms by which consumption of indole-3-carbinol might influence cancer incidence focus on its ability to alter estrogen metabolism and other cellular effects. Controlled studies have been performed on such animals as rats, mice, and rainbow trout, introducing various controlled levels of carcinogens, and levels of Indole-3-carbinol into their daily diet. Results showed dose-related decreases in tumoraflatoxin-DNA binding). susceptibility due to Indole-3-carbinol (inferred by decreases in The first direct evidence of pure anti-initiating activity by a natural anticarcinogen (indole-3-carbinol) found in human diet was claimed by Dashwood, et al, in 1989.[2]

    In 2006, Hsu et al proved that indole-3-carbinol induces a G1 growth arrest of human reproductive cancer cells.[3] This is significant in the prevention and treatment of cancer, as the G1 phase of cell growth occurs early in the cell lifecycle, and for most cells is the major period of cell cycle during its lifespan. The G1 phase is marked by synthesis of various enzymes that are required in the next (“S”) phase, including those needed for DNA replication.

    It should be noted that indiscriminant overuse of indole-3-carbinol supplements in hopes of preventing cancer may be unwise, as hormone balance should be tested (via simple blood test) before regular consumption. Such caution is advised due to its effect on estrogen levels (estrogen has a significant impact on brain function).[4][5]

    Dietary sources

    Indole-3-carbinol occurs naturally in cruciferous vegetables such as cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, and kale. It is also widely available in supplement form.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indole-3-carbinol

  5. http://www.realmilk.com/

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