A Phil-for-an-ill Blog

January 21, 2009

Jerry Brunetti – Food as Medicine (1/2; 10/10)


http://www.agri-dynamics.com/

In 1999 Jerry Brunetti was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and given 6 months to live. He did not submit to chemotherapy, but rather, developed his own unique dietary approach to enhance his immune system. In this informative video, Jerry shares his personal experiences and provides his recipe for healthy living. You will learn about the crucial importance of minerals, which foods to choose for your best health requirements and what to avoid. After viewing this video you’ll realize the remarkable value of food in building good foundations, and providing buffers, to keep your body healthy.

Topics of the first video include:

  1. Why we are losing the ‘war’ on Cancer
  2. Metastasis kills 90% of the cancer patients; 50% die of cachexia (wasting disease).
  3. The virtue of the immune system in combating disease, including cancer.
  4. Chemotherapy agents MOP and CHOP are derivatives of WWI mustard gas.
  5. Angiogenesis and why cutting out the primary tumor is bad.
  6. Obesity, diabetes and the sugar consumption explosion.
  7. The greatest of health threats called Iatrogenic disease – illness caused by modern medicine.
  8. The superficiality of regular medicine with regards to the US cancer patient.
  9. Negative synergy of cocktails of different toxins.
  10. Why Prunes and Eggs are healthy foods.
  11. Selenium the antidote to mercury.
  12. The benefits of resveratrol.
  13. The benefits of Blueberries, Strawberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Apples, Elderberries, Black Cherries, Lycopene, Pumpkins.
  14. How foods barely contain minerals in the US.
  15. Vegetables of the cross/cruciferous vegetables – “nr 1 vegetables in protecting against cancer”.
  16. Why antacids are not the answer to your stomach troubles.

Check out the accompanying resources page for slides and food advice.

Video 1; Part 1of10
Video 1; Part 2of10
Video 1; Part 3of10
Video 1; Part 4of10
Video 1; Part 5of10
Video 1; Part 6of10
Video 1; Part 7of10
Video 1; Part 8of10
Video 1; Part 9of10

Video 2; Part 1of9
Video 2; Part 2of9
Video 2; Part 3of9
Video 2; Part 4of9
Video 2; Part 5of9
Video 2; Part 6of9
Video 2; Part 7of9
Video 2; Part 8of9
Video 2; Part 9of9

Notes: (blue bold-faced emphasis is all mine)

  1. Lacto-Fermentation

    by Sally Fallon

    From Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats, available from New Trends Publishing.

    The ancient Greeks understood that important chemical changes took place during this type of fermentation. Their name for this change was “alchemy.” Like the fermentation of dairy products, preservation of vegetables and fruits by the process of lacto-fermentation has numerous advantages beyond those of simple preservation. The proliferation of lactobacilli in fermented vegetables enhances their digestibility and increases vitamin levels. These beneficial organisms produce numerous helpful enzymes as well as antibiotic and anticarcinogenic substances. Their main by-product, lactic acid, not only keeps vegetables and fruits in a state of perfect preservation but also promotes the growth of healthy flora throughout the intestine. Other alchemical by-products include hydrogen peroxide and small amounts of benzoic acid.

    A partial list of lacto-fermented vegetables from around the world is sufficient to prove the universality of this practice. In Europe the principle lacto-fermented food is sauerkraut. Described in Roman texts, it was prized for both for its delicious taste as well as its medicinal properties. Cucumbers, beets and turnips are also traditional foods for lacto-fermentation. Less well known are ancient recipes for pickled herbs, sorrel leaves and grape leaves. In Russia and Poland one finds pickled green tomatoes, peppers and lettuces. Lacto-fermented foods form part of Asian cuisines as well. The peoples of Japan, China and Korea make pickled preparations of cabbage, turnip, eggplant, cucumber, onion, squash and carrot. Korean kimchi, for example, is a lacto-fermented condiment of cabbage with other vegetables and seasonings that is eaten on a daily basis and no Japanese meal is complete without a portion of pickled vegetable. American tradition includes many types of relishes–corn relish, cucumber relish, watermelon rind–all of which were no doubt originally lacto-fermented products. The pickling of fruit is less well known but, nevertheless, found in many traditional cultures. The Japanese prize pickled umeboshi plums, and the peoples of India traditionally fermented fruit with spices to make chutneys.

    Lacto-fermented condiments are easy to make. Fruits and vegetables are first washed and cut up, mixed with salt and herbs or spices and then pounded briefly to release juices. They are then pressed into an air tight container. Salt inhibits putrefying bacteria for several days until enough lactic acid is produced to preserve the vegetables for many months. The amount of salt can be reduced or even eliminated if whey is added to the pickling solution. Rich in lactic acid and lactic-acid-producing bacteria, whey acts as an inoculant, reducing the time needed for sufficient lactic acid to be produced to ensure preservation. Use of whey will result in consistently successful pickling; it is essential for pickling fruits. During the first few days of fermentation, the vegetables are kept at room temperature; afterwards, they must be placed in a cool, dark place for long-term preservation.

    http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/lacto.html

    Related source:
    http://www.rosicrucianfellowship.com/rays/lacto-fermentation.pdf

  2. Leaky gut syndrome

    Leaky gut syndrome is a diagnosis prevalent in various branches of alternative medicine. Its proponents hypothesize that damage to the bowel lining, caused by antibiotics, toxins, poor diet, parasites or infection (e.g. with the yeast Candida albicans) [1] can lead to increased permeability of the gut wall to toxins, microbes, undigested food, waste or larger than normal macromolecules.[2] Some versions posit that these substances affect the body directly, while others postulate an immune reaction to these substances.[3]

    While many practitioners maintain that leaky gut syndrome is a bona fide medical condition, the area of “gut problems” lies between conventional and alternative medicine, and includes other diagnoses such as small bowel bacterial overgrowth syndrome or small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and yeast syndrome or systemic candidiasis, and remains controversial and scientifically unsettled.[4]

    Alternative practitioners believe that leaky gut syndrome is a possible starting point or connection with many disorders such as asthma, diabetes, autoimmune diseases like lupus, diseases like scleroderma, internal colitis, long term disorders like rheumatoid arthritis, severe illnesses like multiple sclerosis and chronic fatigue syndrome and Crohn’s disease. [5]

    A 2008 study found that children with autism had no more peptides in their urine than typical children, casting doubt on the proposed mechanism underlying the leaky-gut theory and autism.[6]

    Doctors or other health care practitioners who diagnose this syndrome explain that the lining or cell walls of the intestines “expand”, allowing larger, incompletely digested particles to be partially absorbed. The intestine walls become inflamed due to the reaction of white blood cells to encapsulate the non-nutritive particles, causing a semi-infectious state. Low grade fever, transient gut pain, and a sense of inability to absorb nutrients are some reported symptoms in otherwise undiagnosed patients.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leaky_gut

1 Comment »

  1. oh i love alternative medicines, they are usually effective but with lesser bad side effects compared to conventional medicatio ,,

    Comment by Microcontroller Programming : — October 31, 2010 @ 8:19 am | Reply


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