A Phil-for-an-ill Blog

January 21, 2009

Jerry Brunetti – Food as Medicine (1/2; 9/10)


http://www.agri-dynamics.com/

In 1999 Jerry Brunetti was diagnosed with Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma and given 6 months to live. He did not submit to chemotherapy, but rather, developed his own unique dietary approach to enhance his immune system. In this informative video, Jerry shares his personal experiences and provides his recipe for healthy living. You will learn about the crucial importance of minerals, which foods to choose for your best health requirements and what to avoid. After viewing this video you’ll realize the remarkable value of food in building good foundations, and providing buffers, to keep your body healthy.

Topics of the first video include:

  1. Why we are losing the ‘war’ on Cancer
  2. Metastasis kills 90% of the cancer patients; 50% die of cachexia (wasting disease).
  3. The virtue of the immune system in combating disease, including cancer.
  4. Chemotherapy agents MOP and CHOP are derivatives of WWI mustard gas.
  5. Angiogenesis and why cutting out the primary tumor is bad.
  6. Obesity, diabetes and the sugar consumption explosion.
  7. The greatest of health threats called Iatrogenic disease – illness caused by modern medicine.
  8. The superficiality of regular medicine with regards to the US cancer patient.
  9. Negative synergy of cocktails of different toxins.
  10. Why Prunes and Eggs are healthy foods.
  11. Selenium the antidote to mercury.
  12. The benefits of resveratrol.
  13. The benefits of Blueberries, Strawberries, Raspberries, Cranberries, Apples, Elderberries, Black Cherries, Lycopene, Pumpkins.
  14. How foods barely contain minerals in the US.
  15. Vegetables of the cross/cruciferous vegetables – “nr 1 vegetables in protecting against cancer”.
  16. Why antacids are not the answer to your stomach troubles.

Check out the accompanying resources page for slides and food advice.

Video 1; Part 1of10
Video 1; Part 2of10
Video 1; Part 3of10
Video 1; Part 4of10
Video 1; Part 5of10
Video 1; Part 6of10
Video 1; Part 7of10
Video 1; Part 8of10

Video 1; Part 10of10

Video 2; Part 1of9
Video 2; Part 2of9
Video 2; Part 3of9
Video 2; Part 4of9
Video 2; Part 5of9
Video 2; Part 6of9
Video 2; Part 7of9
Video 2; Part 8of9
Video 2; Part 9of9

Notes: (blue bold-faced emphasis is all mine)

  1. Vitamin D

    Vitamin D is a group of fat-soluble prohormones, the two major forms of which are vitamin D2 (or ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (or cholecalciferol).[1] The term vitamin D also refers to metabolites and other analogues of these substances. Vitamin D3 is produced in skin exposed to sunlight, specifically ultraviolet B radiation.

    Vitamin D plays an important role in the maintenance of organ systems.[2]

    Vitamin D deficiency can result from inadequate intake coupled with inadequate sunlight exposure, disorders that limit its absorption, conditions that impair conversion of vitamin D into active metabolites, such as liver or kidney disorders, or, rarely, by a number of hereditary disorders.[2] Deficiency results in impaired bone mineralization, and leads to bone softening diseases, rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults, and possibly contributes to osteoporosis. However, sunlight exposure, to avoid deficiency, carries other risks, including skin cancer; this risk is avoided with dietary absorption, either through diet or as a dietary supplement.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitamin_D

  2. Apoptosis

    Apoptosis (IPA: /?æp?p’to?s?s/(the second ‘p’ is soft) [1]) is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that may occur in multicellular organisms. Programmed cell death involves a series of biochemical events leading to a characteristic cell morphology and death, in more specific terms, a series of biochemical events that lead to a variety of morphological changes, including blebbing, changes to the cell membrane such as loss of membrane asymmetry and attachment, cell shrinkage, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, and chromosomal DNA fragmentation (1-4). (See also Apoptosis DNA fragmentation.) Processes of disposal of cellular debris whose results do not damage the organism differentiate apoptosis from necrosis.

    In contrast to necrosis, which is a form of traumatic cell death that results from acute cellular injury, apoptosis, in general, confers advantages during an organism’s life cycle. For example, the differentiation of fingers and toes in a developing human embryo occurs because cells between the fingers apoptose; the result is that the digits are separate. Between 50 billion and 70 billion cells die each day due to apoptosis in the average human adult. For an average child between the ages of 8 and 14, approximately 20 billion to 30 billion cells die a day. In a year, this amounts to the proliferation and subsequent destruction of a mass of cells equal to an individual’s body weight.

    Research on apoptosis has increased substantially since the early 1990s. In addition to its importance as a biological phenomenon, defective apoptotic processes have been implicated in an extensive variety of diseases. Excessive apoptosis causes hypotrophy, such as in ischemic damage, whereas an insufficient amount results in uncontrolled cell proliferation, such as cancer.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apoptosis

  3. Goitrogen

    Goitrogens are substances that suppress the function of the thyroid gland by interfering with iodine uptake which can, as a result, cause an enlargement of the thyroid, i.e. a goitre.

    Goitrogenic drugs and chemicals

    Chemicals that have been shown to have goitrogenic effects include:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogen

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